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Prison Resistance: Inside/Outside Movements to Transform U.S. Prisons - Shared screen with speaker view
Melekete Melaku
53:12
so glad you could join us, Chazidy!
chazidy bowman
53:48
thank you for having me. excited to hear the conversation
Damian Calvert
01:18:43
Hi Tim!
Tim Black
01:19:13
Great to see you Damian!
Damian Calvert
01:36:10
I have to teach my class in the CBCF at 6. Great info thus far
Damian Calvert
01:51:21
I am so appreciative for the wisdom these Souls have shared thus far. Tim, is it possible to email me a summary of the topics along with some of the numbers shared in the presentations?
Tim Black
01:51:56
Thanks for coming Damian. See you soon.
Alireza Nourani-Dargiri
02:16:57
Thank you all for your time! I greatly appreciate the discussion and all that the panelist have brought
Jessica Kelley
02:20:12
It seems ironic to me that federal definitions of human subjects in research define incarcerated persons as a vulnerable population. It is extremely difficult to conduct research in prisons because of this status as vulnerable. While on the one hand it seems we are protecting incarcerated people from exploitation, on the other hand it seems that it functions to keep researchers out of prisons whose work may not reflect positively on the institutions. No need to discuss, just a reflection.
Jacob Rivera
02:20:25
Excellent Points, Mr. Santiago!
Dan Berger
02:21:48
Here’s the book by Prof. Harris that Prof. Miller just mentioned: https://alexes-harris.com/a-pound-of-flesh/
Dan Berger
02:21:54
On legal fines & fees
Allison Whitacre
02:22:07
Unfortunately I can't stay for the rest of the discussion, but this was incredibly insightful and I learned a lot! Thank you all so much for hosting!
Dan Berger
02:24:32
Thanks for that observation, Jessica! I totally agree
Dan Berger
02:25:30
And those protections around vulnerable populations come precisely because of unethical and violent exploitation of the very same people, by the same institutions who now decide what is or is not ethical
Sarin Gole
02:29:02
For the panelists - what specific mechanism of the carceral state would you guys focus on academically or legally in order to decrease rates of recidivism as Gabriel described It.
Amani Sawari
02:32:32
To find more on Causes and Campaigns amplified through SawariMedia and opportunities to connect with folks on the insidehttp://sawarimi.org/causeshttp://sawarimi.org/coronavirus-relief
Amani Sawari
02:34:40
<3
Ronald Simpson-Bey
02:35:17
Emergency Management Plans in Prisons: https://jlusa.org/justus/ Legislative Letter writing campaign: https://secure.everyaction.com/HDnIn0wrL0a1IFXD4tZPFg2
Sophie Ordway
02:35:58
I think in addition to focusing on policies that may not appear to be directly related to criminal legal transformation/abolition, we also need to have real conversations about how we respond to violence and what happens when a person causes serious harm. Mass incarceration cannot be remedied without addressing violence, most people in prison are in fact in there for what's considered to be a 'violent or serious' crime, so only focusing on low-hanging fruit like drug policy reform will not do much.
Dan Berger
02:36:35
Absolutely! The work of Common Justice is one of many great examples of addressing harm. See also www.transformharm.org
Sophie Ordway
02:38:28
^^Yes!
Dan Berger
02:38:36
Another great example of transformative justice in WA, including WA prisons, is Collective Justice: https://www.facebook.com/collectivejusticenw/
Dan Berger
02:41:04
Great campaign in NY along the lines Toussaint is talking about: Release Aging People in Prison https://rappcampaign.com/
Dan Berger
02:41:47
Great project against Life Without Parole in PA, aka the other death penalty: http://lifelines-project.org/
Jessica Kelley
02:42:36
Thanks for the resources Dan and Amani!
Kimberly Armbruster
02:42:37
Thank you everyone!!!
David Carter
02:42:39
Thank you everyone!!
Piet van Lier
02:42:39
Thank you all for this great conversation!!
Anna Ryder
02:42:41
Thank you!!
chazidy bowman
02:42:43
thank you guys
Sophie Ordway
02:42:44
Thank you all!
Roshana Krishnappa (she/her)
02:42:45
Thank you!
Abigail Langer (she/her/hers)
02:42:45
thank you!!
Cassi Claytor
02:42:45
Wonderful Panel!
Michele Lew
02:42:45
Thank you!
Sarin Gole
02:42:46
thank you
Isa Malik
02:42:46
Thank you!
Dyanna Burnham
02:42:48
Thank you!
Morgan Jones
02:42:49
Thank you!
Tim Black
02:42:51
thank you!!!
Tim Black
02:42:52
Thank you !!!
Toussaint Losier
02:42:52
thank you all for joining us
Spencier Ciaralli
02:42:54
thank you!
Tim Black
02:42:54
Thank you!!!
Sara Stockinger
02:42:55
Thank-you all!! Appreciate you.
Margaret Sereika
02:42:57
Thank you!
Tim Black
02:42:59
thank you!! it was wonderful!
Aliah Lawson (she/her)
02:43:01
This was wonderful! Thank you!!
Poshan Dahal
02:43:01
thank you!
Jacob Rivera
02:43:02
Wonderful discussion, Thank you all!
Emilymilner
02:43:04
Thank you!
Tim Black
02:43:08
thank you
Tim Black
02:43:11
!
Amani Sawari
02:43:15
SOOOO Glad we got to make it Happen!!!
Reema Sen
02:43:49
thanks
Philena Seldon
02:43:52
This was great. Thank you!!!
Jacob Rivera
02:44:02
Fabulous talk!!
Prester Pickett
02:45:07
Thank you for your efforts